TRACKER

Tracker Noise Appeal Records

Status:
active

Members:

Martin Fuchs: bass, synths, vocals
Max Mühlbacher: guitars, vocals
Daniel Walter: drums, synths, vocals

Contact

tracker is gonna blast you with their kind of art-noise-cum-rock mixture and pull you gently on a drift into the psychedelic. From within, hints of desert rock waft forth. A dime bag pulled out during a DIY generator party off by Palm Desert (think: less tye-dye, more Stooges…).

The fuzzboxes run forth on their own. Comical synth sounds clutter together, together, into chords; chords emanate from the practice room. Cluttered, yes, detailed clutter for the one who listens.

Strap on your proto-punk leather jacket, let the dust cast its desert-y elegance over you, and set your controls for the universe. Let the pictures play forth in your mind and through the associated noise, escape these your grounded city surroundings.

Or when the chairs are around, sit—of course—many have before. tracker has both cast forth their vision of sandy horizons unto the tiniest of living room concerts, and colored the actual horizons at Sardinia’s legendary Duna Jam. Shared the stage with bands as wide as Kreisky, Trail of Dead, Red Fang.

“The style of music here is normally not intended for a wider audience,” said DPRP’s review of their last release, “How I became an alien”. But you’re not a wider audience. It “has a unique and sometimes original vision lurking in the murk,” said PopMatters. Enter the murk if you can find a copy of that album, because it’s out of print and sold out.

tracker’s buried themselves back in the studio for their newest album “rule of three”. Improvisations & riffs & sounds on top of sounds, layered on in into one another, ripped forth as if from the very nucleus of what music is, and was, and can be. The “rule of three” has looked upon with favor this trio’s rock-and-roll mojo. They’re broadening noise rock while pulling themselves together into concise song-oriented output. The nasty fuzz of old is regenerated via Latin influences and undeniably Krautrock-influenced beats. Expect no 90’s pop teeming to admit a bit of Shoegaze in that next refrain.

Gracing the album are a whole host of kindred spirits, with improvisations from: Martin Philadelphy; Gregor Tischberger (the maybe men, Kreisky); Wolfram Leitner (the maybe men, M185) and Dave Schmidt (Sula Bassana, Electric Moon, Krautzone). Kenneth Winkler, of Kentrix fame, did the mastering. Armin List did the artwork.